Stressed and cope with food? My Emotional Eating Workshop can help

If you’ve ever struggled with weight loss due to stress and emotional eating,
an upcoming local Arizona workshop can help.

My workshop called “Coping with Food: Overcoming Emotional Eating” will be held on Saturday, Aug. 6, from 10 a.m.-12 p.m. at Herbalicious of Arizona (423 N Florence St, Casa Grande, AZ 85122). Cost is $20. Participants will learn how to recognize negative behavioral eating patterns, learn mindfulness techniques to help in identifying and dealing with stressful emotions and alter behaviors, and gain a deeper understanding about the mind/body connection.

Interested?

PURCHASE YOUR SEAT HERE!

 

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Baked Squash with Spicy Bulgur Pilaf Recipe

I volunteer every month for an event called Produce On Wheels With Out Waste (POWWOW), and come home with bushels of food as a thank you. The event allows foods that may not be pretty enough for the market or are leftovers to still get to people who are in need. The event allows you to purchase 60 lbs of food for $10. I love this program!

So when I got home a couple of weeks ago and I had so many dang acorn squash that I didn’t know what to do.

Continue reading “Baked Squash with Spicy Bulgur Pilaf Recipe”

Patriotic Pigments: Eat your red, white & blue!

 

Looking down at my breakfast this morning, luscious berries in a cushion of oatmeal, I was suddenly overcome with patriotism. Well, at least I was struck by the patriotic resemblance to our nation’s red, white and blue banner as Fourth of July nears.

And so, I became inspired to talk about the colors in our food! Continue reading “Patriotic Pigments: Eat your red, white & blue!”

Recipe: Easy spicy potato stir fry

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Basic stiry fry for the evening! 1 lb baby potatoes, cut up 1 large yellow onion, diced 4 to 5 diced tomatoes 2 stalks celery, chopped 1 large jalapeno pepper, minced 1 heaping tablespoon minced garlic 1 tsp rosemary 1 tsp turmeric 1 bunch rainbow chard, cut up Cook ingredients (all except chard) over medium high heat, in a half cup water, tamari sauce and red wine vinegar for 20 minutes, stiring often. Add cut up bunch of rainbow chard to top of stir fry to let steam and cover for 10 minutes. Take off heat and mix. Then serve and enjoy! #recipe #healthyfood #holisticnutritionist #holisticlifestyle #foodporn #lovetoeat #tophomecooking #wholefoods #lifestyle #lifecoach #livingfood #foodblogger #cook #nutritionist #healthy #healthcoach nourish #nourishyourbody #nourishyourself #instafood #instafoodie #wellness #soulfood #holisticwellness #letfoodbethymedicine

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Spicy Potato Stir Fry

How to prepare:

Continue reading “Recipe: Easy spicy potato stir fry”

How to get your tomato naked

How to skin a tomato!

  • To blanch tomatoes, start by boiling some water
  • Once boiling, turn off the stove, taking the pot off the heat, and put the tomatoes in
  • After 10 minutes, or once the tomato skins start to split open, put them into some cool water. I used room temperature water (no such thing as cold water out of the tap here in the Arizona summer season!)
  • If the skin hasn’t already split, you can easily pierce it with a knife
  • Be careful when skinning your tomatoes, the little bit of liquid between the skin and the flesh is still pretty hot! When piercing the skin, roll the tomato around a few times in the water to cool off the newly exposed tomato flesh

And that’s how to get a naked tomato, skinned and ready for sauce or soup.

So unexpected (plus a recipe)

Me? Write a cookbook?

Well, after deciding a meal my husband made was too pretty to eat and took out my new studio lights to take pictures – I was hooked. I have awakened a new passion the past few days to design recipes and artistically and visually capture the love I have for food, cooking, and a SOUL (seasonal, organic, unprocessed and local) lifestyle.

Want to take this journey with me?

Continue reading “So unexpected (plus a recipe)”

USDA unveils new online weight planning tool

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and National Institutes of Health (NIH) have partnered to add the NIH Body Weight Planner to USDA’s SuperTracker online tool as a goal-setting resource to help people achieve and stay at a healthy weight. Created in 2011, the SuperTracker tool empowers people to build a healthier diet, manage weight, and rUSDAeduce risk of chronic disease. Users can determine what and how much to eat; track foods, physical activities, and weight; and personalize with goal setting, virtual coaching, and journaling. With science-based technology drawing on years of research, the Body Weight Planner will enable SuperTracker’s more than 5.5 million registered users to tailor their plans to reach a goal weight during a specific timeframe, and maintain that weight afterward.

The math model behind the Body Weight Planner, an online tool published by NIH in 2011, was created to accurately forecast how body weight changes when people alter their diet and exercise habits. This capability was validated using data from multiple controlled studies in people.

“We originally intended the Body Weight Planner as a research tool, but so many people wanted to use it for their own weight management that we knew we needed to adapt it with more information about how to achieve a healthy lifestyle,” said Kevin Hall, Ph.D., who led creation of the Planner and is a senior investigator at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the NIH. “The Planner is a natural fit within the SuperTracker as it lets people accurately determine how many calories and how much exercise is needed to meet their personal weight-management goals.”

The Planner’s calculations reflect the discovery that the widely accepted paradigm that reducing 3,500 calories will shed one pound of weight does not account for slowing of metabolism as people change their diet and physical activities. More recently, the math model was further validated using data from a two-year calorie restriction study of 140 people. With those data, Hall and colleagues showed the model can also provide accurate measurements of calorie intake changes by tracking people’s weight. Researchers are examining how to apply this method for public use.

“We are pleased to offer a variety of interactive tools to support Americans in making healthy lifestyle changes,” said Angie Tagtow, executive director of USDA’s Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, which created and manages SuperTracker. “The NIH Body Weight Planner helps consumers make a plan to reach their goals on their timeline, and SuperTracker helps them achieve it.”

More than two-thirds of American adults are overweight or obese. Maintaining a healthy weight can help prevent complications related to overweight and obesity such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer, some of the leading causes of preventable death.

“NIH’s collaboration with USDA allows the public to quickly reap the benefits of the latest medical research results,” said NIDDK Director Griffin P. Rodgers, M.D. “Sharing resources and expertise lets us get out important information as efficiently as possible, empowering people to take charge of their weight and their health.”

The NIDDK, a component of the NIH, conducts and supports research on diabetes and other endocrine and metabolic diseases; digestive diseases, nutrition and obesity; and kidney, urologic and hematologic diseases. Spanning the full spectrum of medicine and afflicting people of all ages and ethnic groups, these diseases encompass some of the most common, severe and disabling conditions affecting Americans. For more information about the NIDDK and its programs, see http://www.niddk.nih.gov.