Thai (inspired) Noodle Soup

Thai Noodle

So when I need inspiration, I hit the books – recipe books, that is. I have fewer recipe books than you’d think, though. Once I discovered internet recipes and Pinterest, there was no turning back. But there are several I hang onto with beautiful pictures that I turn to for ideas. And this past Friday was one such day.

But not a single recipe took my fancy.

Sure, I had a few ingredients on a shopping list. Yet no congregation of ingredients lit up my heart. It was halfway to the grocery store, though, that a golden vision appeared in my head.

I remembered one visit my husband and I had made to a thai restaurant up in Phoenix, a sister establishment to its neighboring oriental supermarket. Both of our soups had been so beautifully arranged, each ingredient had its place, just waiting for a loving hand to stir and eat. The crisp taste of vegetables, noodles, and hot broth was suddenly all I could think about.

So I whipped this little number. And as usual, my husband would complain that the floor looked like a “lawn mower had come through.” But he was all smiles when he tasted the results.

What I love especially about this recipe is that not everything in soup has to be cooked to mush. I loved the fresh snap of some of the vegetables that I waited until right before serving to place in a hot bowl of broth. While the lemon was not as clear as I would have liked, I recommend adding a touch of lemon juice for flavor.

Thai-Inspired Noodle Soup

Serves 4-6

INGREDIENTS

2 cartons (32-oz) low-salt, Vegetarian No-Chicken Broth
1 yellow onion, diced
6 carrots (julienned)
5 celery stalks (sliced)
1 lemongrass stalk, minced
1/2 of a jalapeño, minced
1 bundles of Bok Choy
8 oz of Buckwheat Soba noodles
Baby Bella mushrooms, sliced (divided)
Spring onions, chopped (divided)
Cilantro, chopped (divided)

PREPARATION

On a stovetop, heat up the broth. As it starts to bubble, add onion, carrots, celery stalks, lemongrass, and jalapeño. Cut the bok choy leaves from the stems, and cut up stems like celery and add to pot. Let it simmer for 15-20 minutes. Add noodles. Cook until tender.

Take bok choy leaves and cut them lengthwise, like ribbons. Ladle out the noodles without broth into a bowl, and add mushrooms, cilantro, spring onions, and bok choy. Ladle a cup of hot soup broth and let stand for a few minutes as fresh uncooked vegetables soften in the hot water. Serve – and ENJOY!.

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The fresh connection

The fresh connection

A couple of weeks ago, my partner and I brought home our first-ever CSA (community supported agriculture) care package from an area organic farm. A CSA is simply an agreement where you pay a local farmer a certain amount for a set period of weeks, for which in return you get a weekly bag of the farm’s crop. They get the monetary support they need for daily operation, and you get a very healthy reward. Win-win for everyone.

When I ever got this bag home, I swore it was related to a clown car. The food just DID NOT stop coming, or so it seemed. This bag was simply BRIMMING with goodies, with even some greens I couldn’t identify. But that never scares us away. It just makes it more fun!

There were fruits, veggies, greens, spices… everything you could ask for. Two weeks later, I’m still trying to get through the last of it. And it was only $25.

Also let me tell you that when it comes to food, nothing says fresh better than taking your produce out of your “shopping bag” (pay no attention to the WHOLE FOODS logo on the side, does not indicate origin!) and each item is still covered with dirt and silt from the ground. They were probably only a few hours old out of the earth.

Aaaaaaaah!

Still think it’s expensive to eat SOUL-fully? Search for yourself to find local organic farmers in your area, and see if they either have Farmer’s Markets or offer CSAs. I don’t think that you would regret it.