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Recipe: Potato Curry

If you’ve been following my blog for the last few months, you probably can tell I like my stuff spicy. And during the winter, I always crave the warmth of Indian foods, like curries. So I looked through my cupboards and fridge, and whipped this up. Continue reading “Recipe: Potato Curry”

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Thai (inspired) Noodle Soup

Thai Noodle

So when I need inspiration, I hit the books – recipe books, that is. I have fewer recipe books than you’d think, though. Once I discovered internet recipes and Pinterest, there was no turning back. But there are several I hang onto with beautiful pictures that I turn to for ideas. And this past Friday was one such day.

But not a single recipe took my fancy.

Sure, I had a few ingredients on a shopping list. Yet no congregation of ingredients lit up my heart. It was halfway to the grocery store, though, that a golden vision appeared in my head.

I remembered one visit my husband and I had made to a thai restaurant up in Phoenix, a sister establishment to its neighboring oriental supermarket. Both of our soups had been so beautifully arranged, each ingredient had its place, just waiting for a loving hand to stir and eat. The crisp taste of vegetables, noodles, and hot broth was suddenly all I could think about.

So I whipped this little number. And as usual, my husband would complain that the floor looked like a “lawn mower had come through.” But he was all smiles when he tasted the results.

What I love especially about this recipe is that not everything in soup has to be cooked to mush. I loved the fresh snap of some of the vegetables that I waited until right before serving to place in a hot bowl of broth. While the lemon was not as clear as I would have liked, I recommend adding a touch of lemon juice for flavor.

Thai-Inspired Noodle Soup

Serves 4-6

INGREDIENTS

2 cartons (32-oz) low-salt, Vegetarian No-Chicken Broth
1 yellow onion, diced
6 carrots (julienned)
5 celery stalks (sliced)
1 lemongrass stalk, minced
1/2 of a jalapeño, minced
1 bundles of Bok Choy
8 oz of Buckwheat Soba noodles
Baby Bella mushrooms, sliced (divided)
Spring onions, chopped (divided)
Cilantro, chopped (divided)

PREPARATION

On a stovetop, heat up the broth. As it starts to bubble, add onion, carrots, celery stalks, lemongrass, and jalapeño. Cut the bok choy leaves from the stems, and cut up stems like celery and add to pot. Let it simmer for 15-20 minutes. Add noodles. Cook until tender.

Take bok choy leaves and cut them lengthwise, like ribbons. Ladle out the noodles without broth into a bowl, and add mushrooms, cilantro, spring onions, and bok choy. Ladle a cup of hot soup broth and let stand for a few minutes as fresh uncooked vegetables soften in the hot water. Serve – and ENJOY!.

Iron & Pregnancy

During a woman’s pregnancy, her blood volume increases by 50 percent.
That is why it is extremely vital that a woman gets enough iron in her diet, and has herself checked for anemia, to ensure enough oxygen is getting to baby and mom’s muscles, brain, etc.
These foods are some of the richest in iron.
foodshighiniron

But some things to keep in mind is that:

A) Caffeine can reduce a woman’s ability to absorb iron. If possible, and drink less or avoid caffeinated beverages such as teas and coffees.
B) Calcium rich foods or supplements can also inhibit iron absorption. Try to consume calcium supplements and iron rich foods at opposite ends of the day.
C) Iron supplements can be hard on the body and result in constipation. While getting from diet alone is recommended, sometimes supplementation is needed. If you can, look for supplements that also include a lot of plant-based items. The fiber can greatly reduce those constipating symptoms.
D) The body more readily absorbs iron that is from animal-based food items, but nature has given us everything we need in order to absorb plant-based (“non-heme”) iron, as well. If we are eating vegetables, we are most likely eating fruits and veggies containing Vitamin C. Vitamin C naturally increases a body’s ability to absorb more iron. Be sure you consume both within a meal to give your body a boost in iron.

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It’s time to celebrate!

Today LinkedIn has told the world (okay, maybe just my connections) that four years ago on this date, Plateful of Soul was born. It’s hard to believe.

Thank goodness for the Internet. If it wasn’t for Facebook reminding me of people’s birthdays, I would probably never remember their special days on time. If it wasn’t for Google calendar reminders, events I’d planned to go to would pass me by. And if it weren’t for LinkedIn, I wouldn’t have been reminded of the journey it’s been the last four years, and to reflect and be grateful.

So on this day in 2013, I took the leap and told the world that I was starting a private lifestyle coaching practice.

This journey had begun years before, though, when I realized that I was tired of struggling with my own personal habits and health – physical and emotional. Continue reading “It’s time to celebrate!”

Why healthy people don’t need to “juice”

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While juicing may still be all the rage in some circles, I can’t find it in my heart to fully get behind it as a well-person’s go-to health fix.

Here are some reasons why: Continue reading “Why healthy people don’t need to “juice””

The paradox of positive thinking

Positive Thinking POS

It’s everywhere, isn’t it? The power of positive thinking.

It will solve all of our problems, it seems to say. We are told to, “Look on the bright side,” “Think positively,” “Cultivate gratitude,”…

While these can be helpful to help us correct gross imbalances of negativity, it isn’t actually the whole answer to a life well-lived. Continue reading “The paradox of positive thinking”

The trouble with my grandmother …

“Never eat what your grandmother wouldn’t recognize as food.”

It’s a pretty ubiquitous caveat today. Somehow that one sentence is supposed to conjure up a homey, heart-tendering scene of all of our grandmothers, and the wisdom she brought to the kitchen. If it doesn’t for you, don’t worry. You’re not alone.

Because in America, we still have a very outdated vision of what that looks like. Continue reading “The trouble with my grandmother …”